Questions and answers about
the UK economy.

Experts

Filter by surname

Imperial College Business School

Richard Green

Richard Green is Professor of sustainable energy business at Imperial College Business School. An economist, he has been studying the economics and regulation of the electricity industry for over 30 years. He has worked on market power in electricity markets, on transmission pricing, and on the economics of decarbonisation, with a particular emphasis on how adding large amounts of renewable generation will change electricity markets and the prices set in them.

Imperial College London

Emile S Greenhalgh

Emile is Professor of Composite Materials in the Aeronautics Department and is Head of the Composite Centre at Imperial College London. He was worked in Composites since 1987, firstly at what is now QinetiQ (Farnborough) until moving into Academia in 2003. He has built considerable expertise in polymer composites, and has pioneered the development of structural power composites, which are mechanically load-bearing materials that have the capacity to store and deliver electrical energy.

Michael Greenstone

University of Bath

Paul Gregg

Paul Gregg sits on the body that sets the Living Wage Commission for the Living Wage Foundation and is a Research Fellow at the Resolution Foundation. Paul was formally a member of the statutory Social Mobility Commission led Alan Milburn. Research interests include: Youth unemployment and Workless households, Intergenerational social mobility, Drivers of social disadvantage, Wage growth and job stability and Child poverty

University of Sheffield

Ian Gregory-Smith

Dr Gregory-Smith’s primary research interests concern the executive labour market and related issues associated with wages, gender, corporate governance, shareholder voting and productivity. He has published articles on the economics of sport (particularly cricket) trying to understand how strategic decisions are made. At Sheffield, he teaches Microeconomics and Industrial Organisation to undergraduate and postgraduate students.

IFS, Manchester

Rachel Griffith

Rachel is an applied microeconomist with a focus on public policy. Her research considers the impacts of government policies on the behaviours of firms, workers, consumers and the functioning of markets. She has published widely on the impacts of policy on nutrition, innovation, and productivity. She is interested in improving the ways that economists communicate with the wider public, and increasing diversity of all kinds in the economics profession.